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By providing a full postcode (such as W1A 1AA), national grid reference (for example SE123456) or latitude, longitude pair (like 54, -0.5) this page will provide a map, terrain plot and detailed information of the location showing the UK and RoI television transmitters that it is possible you receive Freeview, Freeview HD, Youview, BT TV and Saorview from.
 

(Don't know your postcode? Find it at Post Office Postcode finder).

UK Free TV uniquely shows you transmitter coverage maps, aerial to transmitter terrain plots, the closest 10 mobile phone masts (for possible 4G-at-800 interference) as well as tabulated information (sorted by direction, by received signal strength, by frequency, by service names or by transmitter name).

Sample prediction images

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See sample prediction pages


Click on these links to see how this page looks with these sample postcodes: S712NW, SK93RX, CR91RW, DL132TL, CF401QS, SY12QS, WF94SR, GL139AU, RM41AL, LL299UR.

Please note

These predictions are based upon a rooftop aerial and depend on the suitability of the aerial, the distance to the transmitters, the power of their signals, the postcode area, and local terrain.

Comments
Wednesday, 28 May 2014
MikeP
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

12:47 PM

Chelsea
A small indoor portable aerial will not work inside a caravan! The metal body of the van will prevent any signal reaching the aerial.
You need a 'log periodic' aerial, to cover all possible transmiters where you park up, and ideally with an easily erected mast system. Might be worth looking at Labgear LABLPC 400mm 9dB Compact Log Periodic 20: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics (others are available) but this is a short type and some areas may need a stronger reception (longer arm with more cross elements) to recieve the weaker signals better.
There are types available to mount on the A-frame of your caravan and others that are ground mounted with guy ropes. You will always need to adjust the direction it is pointing so it is aimed at the transmitter serving the area you are staying and you need to check whether the cross arms need to be sert horizontal or vertical (the picture linked to above is set horizontal).
When you know where you ar likely to be staying, check which is the local transmitter and not the polarity (H or V) and the channel numbers for the multiplexes provided. When at your location, erect the aerial, aim it roughly with a compass (there is information on this sire about the exact location of all the UK TV transmitters and you have to work out the compass bearing between that and your location), set the polarity (the aerial instruction book will tell you how, so worth reading it) and thenconnect the TV and retune it - again using the TV instruction manual noting you may need to do do a complete reset from an 'initial installation' setting. The manual should tell you how to do that. (That is necessary to eliminate all previous settings that would be for a different location.)
Hope that helps?

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MikeP's 3,056 posts GB
A
Anthony
sentiment_satisfiedBronze

1:39 PM
Accrington

MikeP: high gain wideband aerials are better as they pick up much more signal;bbc reception information recommend these types of aerial for caravanning camping and boating holidays because transmitters their polarizations transmission patterns can vary widely as can terrain and line of sight and local topography. A wideband high gain aerial of at least 32 or 48 elements should ensure max signal reception.

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Anthony's 52 posts GB
MikeP
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

8:11 PM

Anthony
High gain wide band aerials do not have a 'flat' frequency response (usually poorer at the lower channels end), that's why the current advice is to use a log-periodic as they have a much more even response across the whole band that is currently in use and will be so for the foreseeable future. So your suggestion is not ideal for this situation.
I always used a log-periodic on a pole with guys and had decent reception at all the camp sites I visited in England, Wales and Scotland, even in realtively poor recption areas. It was crucual to align the aerial correctly of course. I used a battery (of the car type) powered 14" TV set and never had problems. Others did not have log-periodics and had reception problems that even I as an experienced TV service engineer could not resolve - the aerials were just not up to the job.

I note you are suggesting 32 or 48 element aerials. These have a much narrower reception angle pattern and are far more difficult to allign correctly - and may not be at all suited to the more difficult local terrain conditions. Further, you should m=not be aiming to get 'maximum' signal strength but adequate, too much will mean no reception of some services as the tuner gets 'swamped' and what signal is received cannot be decoded so giving the 'No Signal' warning. Likewise too little will result in apparent loss of some programmes on the weaker multiplexes. You need the TV rto display a strength between 50% and 80%, less or more is not good!

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MikeP's 3,056 posts GB
A
Anthony
sentiment_satisfiedBronze

8:52 PM
Accrington

MikeP: I use a 48 element wideband high gain aerial in accrington lancashire horizontally polarised for full freeview hd reception from Winter Hill tx near bolton and I get ALL freeview sd and hd services without a problem and consistently GOOD quality reception with high signal strength and high quality levels. The further away from the transmitter you are the better the aerial you need;also what you conveniently ignoring and forgetting is that some winter hill viewers in north east lancashire need such good aerials and cabling jobs because there is a wind farm near oswaldtwistle over the tops which is causing reception problems, in that case a log periodic aerial horizontally polarized to winter hill would not solve this effectively at all.

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Anthony's 52 posts GB
Thursday, 29 May 2014
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

2:58 PM

chelsea : See here for some ideas:

TV Aerials for Boats and Caravans

I vouch for the good design of the DM Log. Although it's fixed in my loft I can see that its elements are more rugged than other logs with round elements. The tilting bracket may also be useful for touring.

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Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
MikeP
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

8:41 PM

Antony
You are talking of a fixed installation at your location, the answer was aimed at a question from Chelsea concerning a moveable system suitable for use with a mobile caravan/tent. The two are quite different requirements, especially as different channels are used across the country so an aerial capable of equally good reception everywhere is required - only a log-periodic can provide that and any form of Yagi cannot by its very design. A 'wide band' does not give even reception across all channels, which is a primary requirement of any 'mobile' system.
One other problem with a mobile system is that at some locations it can be very near a transmitter, so a 32 or 48 element may well be too high gain and result in the ubiquitous 'No Signal' message due to excessive gain. Or it may be quite distant from a transmitter in which case the alignment with a high gain aerial becomes far more critical. The acceptance angle of a 48 element can be as little as 3 degrees which is very hard for an amateur to set up accurately - especially if it is raining or blowing a gale at the camp/caravan site.

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MikeP's 3,056 posts GB
D
Dave Proctor
11:48 PM
Stoke-on-trent

We can only receive freeview from the Leek transmitter with regular picture breakups. Why can't we receive many stations that other freeview transmitters put out ,like ITV 3 and ITV4 and many others??

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Dave Proctor's 1 post GB
Friday, 30 May 2014
Dave Lindsay
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

1:13 AM

Dave Proctor: The reason that the Leek transmitter does not broadcast the Commercial multiplexes because the operators don't want to pay. See:

Leek (Staffordshire, England) Freeview Light transmitter | ukfree.tv - 11 years of independent, free digital TV advice

Perhaps the breakup in the signal is due to the Fenton transmitter which uses the same frequencies. It would also appear to be the case that you do not have line-of-sight with Leek.

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Dave Lindsay's 5,724 posts GB
E
E Brain
8:58 AM

Every morning at approx. 8.30=9.00 am the reception on my freeview tv keeps loosing signal. What can be the cause?

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E Brain's 1 post GB
Thursday, 5 June 2014
A
Anna Doughty
8:04 PM
Nottingham

Tonight we have pixilating , picture break up, high pitched noises in between sound breaking up, this happen s quite regularly and yet the set works perfectly in between, we have not touched any settings, it used to happen more when it was windy, but now
even when still.

Any ideas anyone? really annoying if you want to watch something.


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Anna Doughty's 1 post GB
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Your comment please
Please post a question, answer or commentIf you have Freeview reception problems before posting a question your must first do this Freeview reset procedure then see: Freeview reception has changed, Single frequency interference, and Freeview intermittent interference.

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If you have other problems, please provide a full (not partial) postcode (or preferably enter it in box at the top right) and indicate where if aerial is on the roof, in the loft or elsewhere.

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